A Clever Lamp Without a Bulb That Still Projects a Classic Silhouette

A Clever Lamp Without a Bulb That Still Projects a Classic Silhouette

You can buy light bulbs with every kind of color temperature, brightness, and finish you can imagine these days. So the need for a lamp shade to diffuse, soften, and direct their light is all but unnecessary—unless you yearn for that classic lamp silhouette. In that case, this LED lamp from YOY design is a clever compromise.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/P91f2wUOaAg/a-clever-lamp-without-a-bulb-that-still-projects-a-clas-1563425159
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Winners named in 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards competition

Winners named in 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards competition

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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
202-326-6431
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Stories about efforts to prevent the Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes, about evolutionary stress on endangered pupfish in the Mojave Desert, and about the use of “crowdsourcing” to solve tough biological problems are among the winners of the 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards.

The awards, administered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) since their inception in 1945, go to professional journalists for distinguished reporting for a general audience. The Kavli Foundation provided a generous endowment in 2009 that ensures the future of the awards program.

Independent panels of science journalists pick the winners, who will receive $3,000 and a plaque at the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago in February.

Dan Egan, a science writer for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, won the award for the large newspaper category for a three-part series, “Deep Trouble,” that examined why a seemingly radical solution damming and reversing the flow of the Chicago River may be necessary to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive Asian carp. The reporting was done as part of a master’s thesis project at Columbia University, Egan said.

“I want to thank my editors for letting me go to New York to stretch my ability to write about these complicated topics, and for recognizing there was such a strange and interesting story lurking in the Chicago River,” Egan said.

Hillary Rosner, the winner in the magazine category for a piece in Wired, also considered some of the consequences of a rogue fish population. She described what happened when a few pupfish from a different species managed to infiltrate a refuge designed to preserve the endangered Devil’s Hole pupfish in the Mojave Desert. The possible response to the invasion, she found, goes against conventional thinking on how to protect an endangered species.

Rosner, too, thanked her editors for “seeing the promise in this story, which deals with some of the serious issues both biological and philosophical facing the future of conservation.”

Joshua Seftel won the television award for spot news/feature reporting for a NOVA scienceNOW segment on Adrien Treuille, a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University. Treuille has harnessed the brainpower of thousands of people who play computer games as a way to help solve difficult problems such as protein folding. David Baron, health and science editor for Public Radio International’s “The World” and a contest judge, said Seftel’s segment “brought energy and artistry to a topic that could easily be dry. A great concept, brilliantly executed.”

Barbara Lich of GEOlino, a German science magazine for children, won the award for writing about science for children. The children’s science news award, established in 2005, is the only AAAS Kavli award open to journalists for media outlets not based in the United States.

Alan I. Leshner, chief executive officer of AAAS and executive publisher of the journal Science, said the total of 485 entries for this year’s contest suggests that “science writing remains a vital and engaging enterprise, both in traditional venues and in the evolving online world.”

The full list of winners of the 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards:

LARGE NEWSPAPER: Circulation of 100,000 or more

Dan Egan

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

“Deep Trouble” (series)

Aug. 19, Aug. 22 and Aug. 26, 2012

Egan reported that DNA analysis by a University of Notre Dame team showed that Asian carp likely had breached an experimental electric barrier designed to block them from reaching Lake Michigan. In his comprehensive and well-reported “Deep Trouble” series, Egan examined why reversing the flow of the Chicago River so that it no longer connects with the Mississippi basin via a canal could be the only feasible method to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive carp. In the series, Egan takes his readers deep into both the biology and the policy questions surrounding the carp invasion. Laura Helmuth, science editor for Slate, said the personalities in Egan’s reporting are “rich and real, full of good intentions, worries, and doubts.” She added, “The history of engineering, public works, and invasive species battles is woven into the story elegantly. It’s a fascinating read, full of drama and passion.” The judges were impressed by the quality of entries in the large-newspaper category this year, but they decided Egan was a clear winner. “His was science reporting with considerable impact on a topic of national importance,” said Robert Lee Hotz, a science writer for The Wall Street Journal.

SMALL NEWSPAPER: Circulation less than 100,000

Azeen Ghorayshi

East Bay Express

“Warning: Quake in 60 Seconds”

May 1, 2013

An early warning system could save thousands of lives when the next major earthquake hits the West Coast. Ghorayshi reported on the work of a group at the University of California at Berkeley that has been developing such a warning system, and she pointed out the wide gap between the United States and Japan in the deployment of such systems. Hotz said Ghorayshi’s piece was “sound on science and sage on the politics of earthquake early warning systems.” Ghorayshi “made a great case for why California needs to follow Japan’s lead in investing in earthquake prediction systems,” Helmuth said. The story explained “complicated seismology questions clearly and engagingly,” she said. Ghorayshi said she “found the case of how Japanese deal with earthquakes head-on as a culture quite fascinating, especially where Californians are more likely to shrug them off as an inevitability.”

MAGAZINE

Hillary Rosner

Wired

“Attack of the Mutant Pupfish”

December 2012

When a few pupfish from a different species managed to infiltrate a refuge designed to preserve the endangered Devil’s Hole pupfish in the Mojave Desert, the invaders quickly spread their DNA throughout the captive population. Within about five years, every fish in the pool was descended from the invaders, who gave their offspring telltale genes and an extra set of fins. Wildlife officials moved all the hybrids to a hatchery, but one evolutionary biologist recognized that the influx of new genes was correcting a glut of defective DNA that accumulates in a small population. That suggested the endangered fish could be saved by allowing hybridization to proceed, but that would go against the old conservation approach that called for fencing off swaths of wilderness and stepping aside. In the new order, Rosner wrote, “we’d be the stewards not just of land or wildlife but of individual chromosomes.” Through great storytelling and use of language, Rosner “explains a fascinating topicwhat is a species and how does that impact what we should and shouldn’t do to save it,” said judge Sarah Zielinski, a freelance science writer who also works for Science News. Freelancer Guy Gugliotta said Rosner’s story “bears on the future of life on the planet. Should species be allowed to die if they cannot be saved as evolution has decreed?” Rosner won the AAAS Kavli award in 2010 in the small newspaper category.

TELEVISION

Spot News/Feature Reporting (20 minutes or less)

Joshua Seftel

NOVA scienceNOW

“Adrien Treuille Profile”

Nov. 14, 2012

Adrien Treuille of Carnegie Mellon University created a game called FoldIt, which turns protein-folding a puzzle that is difficult for even the most powerful computers into a task that even a ten-year-old can take on. In just three weeks in 2011, FoldIt players (there are now more than 300,000 of them) solved the folding pattern for a protein that helps the HIV virus reproduce. In another game called EteRNA, more than 40,000 players have helped discover new rules for how the RNA molecule folds. “The program wisely allows the impassioned young scientist Adrien Treuille to carry the narrative, augmented with informative and beautiful graphics, as he explains how he converted his childhood obsession into a way of harnessing human brain power to solve scientific puzzles,” said judge Kathy Sawyer, a freelance science writer who was formerly with The Washington Post. “I’m grateful that NOVA cares about telling the important stories in science stories like Adrien Treiulle’s which give me hope for the future,” Seftel said. He was a winner in the online category in 2011.

In-Depth Reporting (more than 20 minutes)

Dennis Wells, Linda Goldman, David Royle

Smithsonian Channel

“Killer in the Caves”

March 13, 2013

Bats in North America are dying by the millions, victims of a mysterious fungus that causes white-nose syndrome and has produced one of the greatest wildlife disasters in U.S. history. “Killer in the Caves” follows bat expert DeeAnn Reeder of Bucknell University and wildlife manager Greg Turner of the Pennsylvania Game Commission in their fight against a disease that is driving little brown bats, one of the most common bat species in the northeastern United States, toward extinction. It also is causing mass mortalities among five other species. The program “paired fantastic visuals and video technology with a compelling scientific mystery that is superbly explained,” said judge Christine Dell’Amore, a science writer for NationalGeographic.com. Tina Hesman Saey of Science News said the program “humanizes scientists as well as illuminating the process of doing science, with its frustrations and disappointments but also inklings of hope.” Dennis Wells, the producer, director and writer of the program said: “I didn’t expect just how passionate the researchers can be. At 4 a.m. after finishing 14 hours of work in a cold, damp cave they would cheerfully discuss potential avenues of further research while the ‘tough’ film crew was in the back of the car covered in mud and completely beat. It was very impressive.”

RADIO

Howard Berkes, Andrea de Leon, Sandra Bartlett, NPR, and Chris Hamby, The Center for Public Integrity

“As Mine Protections Fail, Black Lung Cases Surge”

July 9, 2012

“Black-Lung Rule Loopholes Leave Miners Vulnerable”

July 10, 2012

In a joint investigation by NPR and The Center for Public Integrity, Berkes looked at the resurgence of black lung disease among coal miners, particularly in Virginia, West Virginia and Kentucky. He described how the disease is afflicting younger miners and advancing more quickly to the worst stage of the disease. The two-part series discussed how existing regulatory limits on coal dust are inadequate to protect miners from the increasing levels of silicon dioxide being released as more powerful equipment is used to mine narrow seams of coal. Lauran Neergaard, a science writer for the Associated Press, called the series “a compelling look at the resurgence of an epidemic once thought solvedcomplete with the science to show why the solution didn’t last.” Dan Vergano, senior science editor at NationalGeographic.com, said the entry was “a compelling portrait of the lives of people hurt by the failure of regulatory science.” Berkes said his interest in the resurgence of black lung stems from his extensive reporting about the Upper Big Branch coal mine disaster in 2010 and the medical examiner findings that the victims of that disaster had an extraordinarily high rate of the disease, including younger miners with relatively little tenure underground. “Winning the 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award bolsters our belief that our findings are critically important to the thousands of coal miners who will continue to suffer horribly from black lung if industry and government fail to protect them,” Berkes said.

Certificate of Merit – Radio

The radio judging committee also recognized Ashley Ahearn of KUOW Public Radio in Seattle for a three-part series on coal in the Pacific Northwest (March 11, 2013, March 12, 2013, and June 18, 2013). Energy companies have been assessing several sites for ship terminals in Washington and Oregon where coal could be transferred from trains arriving from the Powder River Basin in Montana and Wyoming. “The prospect of exporting millions of tons of coal through the Northwest is, and will continue to be, the most important story on my beat.” Ahearn said. “My goal in this series was to use science to answer my listeners’ questions about coal’s impacts on human health and the regional environment, as well as the global implications of burning that coal once it gets to Asia.”
Naomi Starobin, news director for WSHU Public Radio in Fairfield, Conn., called Ahearn’s series “a wonderful example of solid, important local reporting.” The judges, on occasion, give certificates of merit to runner-up entries that are considered to be particularly noteworthy.

ONLINE

Phil McKenna

MATTER

“Uprising: Can a self-trained scientist solve one of the biggest problems in energy policy?”

Feb. 21, 2013

Bob Ackley spent his life working the streets for some of America’s biggest gas companies. More recently, with the help of Boston University’s Nathan Phillips, he has been tracking the gas that leaks from underground pipelines, all with full knowledge of the industry. He has concluded that the amount of natural gas leaking beneath city streets is far greater than previously realized. Some scientists now believe such leaks may be helping to accelerate climate change in a way that few had suspectedeven as governments worldwide are backing natural gas as an alternative to coal. McKenna’s story, written for MATTER, a new online site dedicated to long-form science journalism, introduced readers to Ackley and his dogged pursuit of urban gas leaks, including his decoding of clues such as fungal growth at the base of trees and gooey black soil that were signs of leaks. For Phillips, who began his scientific career studying the physiology of trees, it was an eye-opening experience. “Science is all too often something that is only done by scientists in a formal laboratory setting,” McKenna said. “It was fascinating to profile a gas company whistle blower who turned some of the world’s leading climate scientists on to a problem lurking literally right beneath their feet.” Seth Borenstein of the Associated Press called the story “enthralling and well-written,” bringing to light a little-known problem. John Carey, a freelance science writer, called it a “wonderful narrative using a compelling character to illuminate one of the important issues in climate science.”

CHILDREN’S SCIENCE NEWS

Barbara Lich

GEOlino magazine (Germany)

“Kaltwasserkorallen: Ein Paradies am Meeresgrund”

(“Cold Water Corals: Paradise on the Seabed”)

October 2012

While corals have been well-studied in tropical reefs, Barbara Lich told her young readers about the lesser-known cold water corals living hundreds of meters below the ocean’s surface, a realm only reachable by a crewed submersible. She accompanied a team of research biologists from the Helmholtz Center for Oceanic Research in Kiel, Germany as they explored the depths of Norway’s Trondheim Fjord in a submersible called Jago. “The article had really nice details that made readers feel they are there, underwater in a submersible,” said Lila Guterman of Science News. “It had a real strength in its clear description of an experimentshowing how science is done.” Catherine Hughes of National Geographic Kids praised the article’s “clear, linear explanations and interesting conclusions that illustrate the scientific process.” Lich said she wanted to take her young readers “into the water, to the reef deep down in the fjord, to show them the beauty of this mystical world that I had the chance to see with Jago. And I wanted to make them aware of how fragile this world is because of ocean acidification and climate change.”

###

The Kavli Foundation is dedicated to advancing science for the benefit of humanity, promoting public understanding of scientific research, and supporting scientists and their work. The Foundation’s mission is implemented through an international program of research institutes in the fields of astrophysics, nanoscience, neuroscience, and theoretical physics, and through the support of conferences, symposia, endowed professorships, and other activities, including the Kavli Science Journalism Workshops at the Knight Science Journalism Fellowships at MIT. The Foundation is also a founding partner of the biennial Kavli Prizes, which recognize scientists for their seminal advances in three research areas: astrophysics, nanoscience, and neuroscience.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world’s largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journal, Science as well as Science Translational Medicine and Science Signaling. AAAS was founded in 1848, and includes 261 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated total readership of 1 million. The non-profit AAAS is open to all and fulfills its mission to “advance science and serve society” through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, and more. For the latest research news, log onto EurekAlert!, http://www.eurekalert.org, the premier science-news Web site, a service of AAAS.



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Winners named in 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards competition

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

6-Nov-2013

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]


Share Share

Contact: Earl Lane
elane@aaas.org
202-326-6431
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Stories about efforts to prevent the Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes, about evolutionary stress on endangered pupfish in the Mojave Desert, and about the use of “crowdsourcing” to solve tough biological problems are among the winners of the 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards.

The awards, administered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) since their inception in 1945, go to professional journalists for distinguished reporting for a general audience. The Kavli Foundation provided a generous endowment in 2009 that ensures the future of the awards program.

Independent panels of science journalists pick the winners, who will receive $3,000 and a plaque at the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago in February.

Dan Egan, a science writer for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, won the award for the large newspaper category for a three-part series, “Deep Trouble,” that examined why a seemingly radical solution damming and reversing the flow of the Chicago River may be necessary to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive Asian carp. The reporting was done as part of a master’s thesis project at Columbia University, Egan said.

“I want to thank my editors for letting me go to New York to stretch my ability to write about these complicated topics, and for recognizing there was such a strange and interesting story lurking in the Chicago River,” Egan said.

Hillary Rosner, the winner in the magazine category for a piece in Wired, also considered some of the consequences of a rogue fish population. She described what happened when a few pupfish from a different species managed to infiltrate a refuge designed to preserve the endangered Devil’s Hole pupfish in the Mojave Desert. The possible response to the invasion, she found, goes against conventional thinking on how to protect an endangered species.

Rosner, too, thanked her editors for “seeing the promise in this story, which deals with some of the serious issues both biological and philosophical facing the future of conservation.”

Joshua Seftel won the television award for spot news/feature reporting for a NOVA scienceNOW segment on Adrien Treuille, a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University. Treuille has harnessed the brainpower of thousands of people who play computer games as a way to help solve difficult problems such as protein folding. David Baron, health and science editor for Public Radio International’s “The World” and a contest judge, said Seftel’s segment “brought energy and artistry to a topic that could easily be dry. A great concept, brilliantly executed.”

Barbara Lich of GEOlino, a German science magazine for children, won the award for writing about science for children. The children’s science news award, established in 2005, is the only AAAS Kavli award open to journalists for media outlets not based in the United States.

Alan I. Leshner, chief executive officer of AAAS and executive publisher of the journal Science, said the total of 485 entries for this year’s contest suggests that “science writing remains a vital and engaging enterprise, both in traditional venues and in the evolving online world.”

The full list of winners of the 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Awards:

LARGE NEWSPAPER: Circulation of 100,000 or more

Dan Egan

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

“Deep Trouble” (series)

Aug. 19, Aug. 22 and Aug. 26, 2012

Egan reported that DNA analysis by a University of Notre Dame team showed that Asian carp likely had breached an experimental electric barrier designed to block them from reaching Lake Michigan. In his comprehensive and well-reported “Deep Trouble” series, Egan examined why reversing the flow of the Chicago River so that it no longer connects with the Mississippi basin via a canal could be the only feasible method to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive carp. In the series, Egan takes his readers deep into both the biology and the policy questions surrounding the carp invasion. Laura Helmuth, science editor for Slate, said the personalities in Egan’s reporting are “rich and real, full of good intentions, worries, and doubts.” She added, “The history of engineering, public works, and invasive species battles is woven into the story elegantly. It’s a fascinating read, full of drama and passion.” The judges were impressed by the quality of entries in the large-newspaper category this year, but they decided Egan was a clear winner. “His was science reporting with considerable impact on a topic of national importance,” said Robert Lee Hotz, a science writer for The Wall Street Journal.

SMALL NEWSPAPER: Circulation less than 100,000

Azeen Ghorayshi

East Bay Express

“Warning: Quake in 60 Seconds”

May 1, 2013

An early warning system could save thousands of lives when the next major earthquake hits the West Coast. Ghorayshi reported on the work of a group at the University of California at Berkeley that has been developing such a warning system, and she pointed out the wide gap between the United States and Japan in the deployment of such systems. Hotz said Ghorayshi’s piece was “sound on science and sage on the politics of earthquake early warning systems.” Ghorayshi “made a great case for why California needs to follow Japan’s lead in investing in earthquake prediction systems,” Helmuth said. The story explained “complicated seismology questions clearly and engagingly,” she said. Ghorayshi said she “found the case of how Japanese deal with earthquakes head-on as a culture quite fascinating, especially where Californians are more likely to shrug them off as an inevitability.”

MAGAZINE

Hillary Rosner

Wired

“Attack of the Mutant Pupfish”

December 2012

When a few pupfish from a different species managed to infiltrate a refuge designed to preserve the endangered Devil’s Hole pupfish in the Mojave Desert, the invaders quickly spread their DNA throughout the captive population. Within about five years, every fish in the pool was descended from the invaders, who gave their offspring telltale genes and an extra set of fins. Wildlife officials moved all the hybrids to a hatchery, but one evolutionary biologist recognized that the influx of new genes was correcting a glut of defective DNA that accumulates in a small population. That suggested the endangered fish could be saved by allowing hybridization to proceed, but that would go against the old conservation approach that called for fencing off swaths of wilderness and stepping aside. In the new order, Rosner wrote, “we’d be the stewards not just of land or wildlife but of individual chromosomes.” Through great storytelling and use of language, Rosner “explains a fascinating topicwhat is a species and how does that impact what we should and shouldn’t do to save it,” said judge Sarah Zielinski, a freelance science writer who also works for Science News. Freelancer Guy Gugliotta said Rosner’s story “bears on the future of life on the planet. Should species be allowed to die if they cannot be saved as evolution has decreed?” Rosner won the AAAS Kavli award in 2010 in the small newspaper category.

TELEVISION

Spot News/Feature Reporting (20 minutes or less)

Joshua Seftel

NOVA scienceNOW

“Adrien Treuille Profile”

Nov. 14, 2012

Adrien Treuille of Carnegie Mellon University created a game called FoldIt, which turns protein-folding a puzzle that is difficult for even the most powerful computers into a task that even a ten-year-old can take on. In just three weeks in 2011, FoldIt players (there are now more than 300,000 of them) solved the folding pattern for a protein that helps the HIV virus reproduce. In another game called EteRNA, more than 40,000 players have helped discover new rules for how the RNA molecule folds. “The program wisely allows the impassioned young scientist Adrien Treuille to carry the narrative, augmented with informative and beautiful graphics, as he explains how he converted his childhood obsession into a way of harnessing human brain power to solve scientific puzzles,” said judge Kathy Sawyer, a freelance science writer who was formerly with The Washington Post. “I’m grateful that NOVA cares about telling the important stories in science stories like Adrien Treiulle’s which give me hope for the future,” Seftel said. He was a winner in the online category in 2011.

In-Depth Reporting (more than 20 minutes)

Dennis Wells, Linda Goldman, David Royle

Smithsonian Channel

“Killer in the Caves”

March 13, 2013

Bats in North America are dying by the millions, victims of a mysterious fungus that causes white-nose syndrome and has produced one of the greatest wildlife disasters in U.S. history. “Killer in the Caves” follows bat expert DeeAnn Reeder of Bucknell University and wildlife manager Greg Turner of the Pennsylvania Game Commission in their fight against a disease that is driving little brown bats, one of the most common bat species in the northeastern United States, toward extinction. It also is causing mass mortalities among five other species. The program “paired fantastic visuals and video technology with a compelling scientific mystery that is superbly explained,” said judge Christine Dell’Amore, a science writer for NationalGeographic.com. Tina Hesman Saey of Science News said the program “humanizes scientists as well as illuminating the process of doing science, with its frustrations and disappointments but also inklings of hope.” Dennis Wells, the producer, director and writer of the program said: “I didn’t expect just how passionate the researchers can be. At 4 a.m. after finishing 14 hours of work in a cold, damp cave they would cheerfully discuss potential avenues of further research while the ‘tough’ film crew was in the back of the car covered in mud and completely beat. It was very impressive.”

RADIO

Howard Berkes, Andrea de Leon, Sandra Bartlett, NPR, and Chris Hamby, The Center for Public Integrity

“As Mine Protections Fail, Black Lung Cases Surge”

July 9, 2012

“Black-Lung Rule Loopholes Leave Miners Vulnerable”

July 10, 2012

In a joint investigation by NPR and The Center for Public Integrity, Berkes looked at the resurgence of black lung disease among coal miners, particularly in Virginia, West Virginia and Kentucky. He described how the disease is afflicting younger miners and advancing more quickly to the worst stage of the disease. The two-part series discussed how existing regulatory limits on coal dust are inadequate to protect miners from the increasing levels of silicon dioxide being released as more powerful equipment is used to mine narrow seams of coal. Lauran Neergaard, a science writer for the Associated Press, called the series “a compelling look at the resurgence of an epidemic once thought solvedcomplete with the science to show why the solution didn’t last.” Dan Vergano, senior science editor at NationalGeographic.com, said the entry was “a compelling portrait of the lives of people hurt by the failure of regulatory science.” Berkes said his interest in the resurgence of black lung stems from his extensive reporting about the Upper Big Branch coal mine disaster in 2010 and the medical examiner findings that the victims of that disaster had an extraordinarily high rate of the disease, including younger miners with relatively little tenure underground. “Winning the 2013 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award bolsters our belief that our findings are critically important to the thousands of coal miners who will continue to suffer horribly from black lung if industry and government fail to protect them,” Berkes said.

Certificate of Merit – Radio

The radio judging committee also recognized Ashley Ahearn of KUOW Public Radio in Seattle for a three-part series on coal in the Pacific Northwest (March 11, 2013, March 12, 2013, and June 18, 2013). Energy companies have been assessing several sites for ship terminals in Washington and Oregon where coal could be transferred from trains arriving from the Powder River Basin in Montana and Wyoming. “The prospect of exporting millions of tons of coal through the Northwest is, and will continue to be, the most important story on my beat.” Ahearn said. “My goal in this series was to use science to answer my listeners’ questions about coal’s impacts on human health and the regional environment, as well as the global implications of burning that coal once it gets to Asia.”
Naomi Starobin, news director for WSHU Public Radio in Fairfield, Conn., called Ahearn’s series “a wonderful example of solid, important local reporting.” The judges, on occasion, give certificates of merit to runner-up entries that are considered to be particularly noteworthy.

ONLINE

Phil McKenna

MATTER

“Uprising: Can a self-trained scientist solve one of the biggest problems in energy policy?”

Feb. 21, 2013

Bob Ackley spent his life working the streets for some of America’s biggest gas companies. More recently, with the help of Boston University’s Nathan Phillips, he has been tracking the gas that leaks from underground pipelines, all with full knowledge of the industry. He has concluded that the amount of natural gas leaking beneath city streets is far greater than previously realized. Some scientists now believe such leaks may be helping to accelerate climate change in a way that few had suspectedeven as governments worldwide are backing natural gas as an alternative to coal. McKenna’s story, written for MATTER, a new online site dedicated to long-form science journalism, introduced readers to Ackley and his dogged pursuit of urban gas leaks, including his decoding of clues such as fungal growth at the base of trees and gooey black soil that were signs of leaks. For Phillips, who began his scientific career studying the physiology of trees, it was an eye-opening experience. “Science is all too often something that is only done by scientists in a formal laboratory setting,” McKenna said. “It was fascinating to profile a gas company whistle blower who turned some of the world’s leading climate scientists on to a problem lurking literally right beneath their feet.” Seth Borenstein of the Associated Press called the story “enthralling and well-written,” bringing to light a little-known problem. John Carey, a freelance science writer, called it a “wonderful narrative using a compelling character to illuminate one of the important issues in climate science.”

CHILDREN’S SCIENCE NEWS

Barbara Lich

GEOlino magazine (Germany)

“Kaltwasserkorallen: Ein Paradies am Meeresgrund”

(“Cold Water Corals: Paradise on the Seabed”)

October 2012

While corals have been well-studied in tropical reefs, Barbara Lich told her young readers about the lesser-known cold water corals living hundreds of meters below the ocean’s surface, a realm only reachable by a crewed submersible. She accompanied a team of research biologists from the Helmholtz Center for Oceanic Research in Kiel, Germany as they explored the depths of Norway’s Trondheim Fjord in a submersible called Jago. “The article had really nice details that made readers feel they are there, underwater in a submersible,” said Lila Guterman of Science News. “It had a real strength in its clear description of an experimentshowing how science is done.” Catherine Hughes of National Geographic Kids praised the article’s “clear, linear explanations and interesting conclusions that illustrate the scientific process.” Lich said she wanted to take her young readers “into the water, to the reef deep down in the fjord, to show them the beauty of this mystical world that I had the chance to see with Jago. And I wanted to make them aware of how fragile this world is because of ocean acidification and climate change.”

###

The Kavli Foundation is dedicated to advancing science for the benefit of humanity, promoting public understanding of scientific research, and supporting scientists and their work. The Foundation’s mission is implemented through an international program of research institutes in the fields of astrophysics, nanoscience, neuroscience, and theoretical physics, and through the support of conferences, symposia, endowed professorships, and other activities, including the Kavli Science Journalism Workshops at the Knight Science Journalism Fellowships at MIT. The Foundation is also a founding partner of the biennial Kavli Prizes, which recognize scientists for their seminal advances in three research areas: astrophysics, nanoscience, and neuroscience.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world’s largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journal, Science as well as Science Translational Medicine and Science Signaling. AAAS was founded in 1848, and includes 261 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated total readership of 1 million. The non-profit AAAS is open to all and fulfills its mission to “advance science and serve society” through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, and more. For the latest research news, log onto EurekAlert!, http://www.eurekalert.org, the premier science-news Web site, a service of AAAS.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/aaft-wni110613.php
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Pet Rescue Saga: Top 10 tips, hints, and cheats!

Pet Rescue Saga: Top 10 tips, hints, and cheats!

The definitive guide to Pet Rescue Saga: How to save more pets, manage your boosters better, and beat levels faster!

Pet Rescue Saga is easily just as addicting as [Candy Crush]( and has the ability to make your life’s goal to save all the cute pets from the animal snatchers. If that sounds like an addiction you’re familiar with, you’ve come to the right place! Here are the best tips, tricks, and cheats I’ve found when it comes to not only beating levels in Pet Rescue Saga, but obliterating them!

1. Worry about your pets first

Pet Rescue Saga Tips and tricks: worry about your pets

In most levels, your number one objective should be saving your pets. This means paying attention to where they are on the board and making your main goal to move them down as fast as you can. Avoid them standing on single colored blocks that can’t be paired with anything around it. In order to do this, you’ll need to think a move or two ahead. Look at what blocks they’re standing on and make every attempt to make sure they’re standing on a stack that can quickly be tapped away when you get to the bottom in order to free them. The less blocks you have, the harder this becomes, so plan for it early on.

2. Plan your moves accordingly

Pet Rescue Saga Tips and tricks: Plan moves accordingly

This somewhat goes with step one but can be applied to any level, pets present or not. Planning moves not only helps you clear levels faster, it also increases your overall score. I’ve found that in most levels, working from the bottom up is the best bet. Pay attention to what’s on top and clear opposite colors on the bottom. This way, those top blocks have a better chance of coming down on like colors that you can then easily clear.

3. What boosters to buy

Pet Rescue Saga Tips and tricks: what boosters to buy

My favorite boosters are Color Pop and the Block Buster. I’ve only ever actually paid for the Block Buster as I find myself getting Color Pops for free quite often, especially if I come back after not playing for several days. The tip to using either of them are to wait until you really need them. If you’re planning a few moves in advance, you should know whether or not you’ll need them.

In my experience, wait to use a booster until you’re towards the end of the level and have no other option to clear a particularly troublesome color or individual block. Sometimes it can make a difference between clearing a level or not.

4. Don’t worry about clearing every single block

Pet Rescue Saga Tips and tricks: don't worry about all blocks

In most levels, you don’t need to clear every single block, this is especially true in levels that involve pets. Worry about clearing the rows with pets in it when you get towards the end. If you need to use boosters or rockets to clear an entire row to get to a pet, I’d do that before worry about a single or double row of blocks with nothing else in it. The score is minimal and the amount you get for saving a pet is worth far more and may actually make the difference between saving enough pets before you run out of moves.

5. Giving and receiving free lives

Pet Rescue Saga Tips and tricks: Free lives

Pay attention to how many lives you have before accepting more from friends. They’ll stay in your inbox as long as you let them but if you accept them when you have full lives, it doesn’t add anymore and you can’t get them back or redeem them later.

I also always make a habit of asking for lives right when I start playing. That way, I may receive some lives while I’m playing and then when I run out, I’ve got a few more go around’s before I actually run out. Then when I’m done, I’ll send out another request so next time I play, I’ve got some extra lives built up.

6. Pay attention to the objectives

Pet Rescue Saga Tips and tricks: objectives

In some levels, the objectives you have to meet can be a little tricky. Especially pay attention to the score requirements. If you save enough pets but don’t meet the score requirements, you don’t pass. This especially sucks if you use a booster you paid for in order to pass the level. If you aren’t close to the required score or pets needed to pass, don’t waste any boosters. It’s better to try your luck again and start the level over.

7. Don’t let your pets get snatched

Pet Rescue Saga Tips and tricks: Pet snatchers

If your pets get too high up on the top of the screen, if they drop off they get taken by the pet snatchers. Pay attention to when the pet gets scared and shakes. That means they’re too close and run the risk of getting snatched. You can’t get that pet back so your total amount of savable pets just went down.

If for some reason you can’t match enough blocks to get the required amount down, you won’t pass the level and you lose a life. You can always pay to get the pets back but if you’re careful not to lose them by letting them reach the top of the screen, this is seldom an issue. I recommend using a rocket when you have one available if a pet is getting dangerously close to the top of the screen.

8. Use bombs and boosters wisely

Pet Rescue Saga Tips and tricks: bombs and boosters

We’ve already discussed bombs and boosters a little in the sections above but referring to them specifically, save them for only when you need them. For most levels, this is typically towards the end when color pairings get harder to make. One rocket or one bomb can make the difference between saving the pet you need to pass, or having to start the level all over again. If you don’t need a booster or you think you can get away with not using it right that second, wait.

9. Having trouble with a level? Try it on the computer instead!

Pet Rescue Saga Tips and tricks: on facebook

Most King games don’t seem to sync up correctly with the actual Facebook versions, Pet Rescue Saga included. I’ve also found that passing hard levels seem a heck of a lot easier on the computer version than they do on the iPhone or iPad variants. I’m not sure why, but that’s always been the case.

When I have a hard time with a level for days on end, I jump on the computer and give it a try. Never fail, I typically pass it in just a few tries. Not to mention, the Facebook version always gives me lots of free crap the iOS version never offers. So, added bonus!

10. Your tips and tricks!

We know there are lots of you out there that play Pet Rescue Sage regularly. If that sounds like you, let us know any clever tips or tricks you’ve figured out by leaving them in the comments below!

See also:

    



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Los Angeles, City of Fiber-Optic Lights?

Los Angeles may soon be inviting ISPs to spend a boatload of money on a major city improvement — a fiber-optic network providing broadband Internet access for all. What’s in it for the vendor? The chance to advertise to the city’s huge population, for one. There might also be opportunities to sell speedier connections — or to bundle paid television and landline services with the free broadband.

Los Angeles is moving forward with a plan to establish a high-speed fiber network across the entire city, according to a report from Ars Technica.

Beginning next month, the Los Angeles Information Technology Agency will issue a request for proposals to bring access to a high-speed fiber network to every residence, business and government entity in the city limits, the publication learned.

Los Angeles reportedly wants its 3.5 million residences and businesses to have free access to the network at speeds of 2 Mbps to 5 Mbps. Higher-speed tiers — up to 1 Gbps — could be subsidized by advertising or fees. The network also could be used to power free public WiFi hotspots.

The city expects the buildout to cost between US$3 billion and $5 billion, Ars said — and that cost would be footed entirely by the vendor.

Curating a Creative Hub

The city is likely hoping that its efforts to provide speedy Internet will attract people of all professions to locate there, said Joel Espelien, senior analyst at TDG Research.

“This is a bold move by Los Angeles to try and create a citywide platform for creative innovation,” he told TechNewsWorld. “In today’s mobile society, the creative class has more choices than ever before about where to live. LA is clearly hoping that free bandwidth may sway the next Spielberg or Tarantino to choose LA over New York or Hong Kong.”

Los Angeles isn’t alone in recognizing the incentive value of offering high-speed Internet to citizens. Google has started rolling out its ultrafast fiber network service, Google Fiber, to U.S. cities including Provo, Utah and Kansas City. AT&T recently announced plans to launch its high-speed Internet service, GigaPower, to a few neighborhoods in Austin starting next month.

Unless Google alters its service to include businesses rather than limiting it to residences, it will not be considered for the initiative, the Los Angeles Information Technology Agency reportedly said.

Angelenos: Don’t Hold Your Breath

LA’s fiber network initiative could play out differently than the efforts from a company like Google or AT&T, said telecom analyst Jeff Kagan.

“Cities and companies are motivated by different things,” he told TechNewsWorld. “Cities want to provide for their people, but don’t have the expertise they need. Companies have the expertise but are motivated by profit.”

Courting a vendor to provide the Internet connection could require lengthy negotiations and prolong the ultimate rollout of a citywide fiber network, said Espelien.

“The vendor will likely get an exclusive advertising platform to a huge and influential population,” he noted. “That certainly has value, but it’s not clear whether it justifies this type of massive investment.”

In addition, the physical and technical challenges of building such a network in a large, highly populated area can’t be overlooked, Espelien added.

“One issue is sustainability,” he pointed out. “Can a service like this work not just in year one, but in year five or 10? Also, Los Angeles is a huge city that covers a large geographic area, including canyons and steep hillsides. It’s not trivial to lay physical infrastructure in a city of that size.”

Overall, the plan is a bold and ambitious, said Kagan, but LA citizens shouldn’t hold their breaths for free Internet access, as there are many hurdles to clear.

“We have seen cities try to bring Internet to their citizens time and time again over the last decade, and we have seen them fail, time and time again,” he told TechNewsWorld. “Will this be any different? I hope so, but I have to hold my judgment until it becomes real.”

Source: http://www.technewsworld.com/rsstory/79356.html
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Oil hovers below $94 ahead of US supplies report

BANGKOK (AP) — Oil hovered below $94 a barrel Wednesday ahead of a report expected to show another increase in U.S. crude stockpiles.

Benchmark U.S. crude for December delivery was up 42 cents at $93.78 a barrel at midafternoon Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract slid $1.25 to $93.37 on Tuesday, adding to a month-long slide.

Crude is down about 10 percent since closing at $104.10 on October 2.

U.S. crude stockpiles have increased in each of the past six weeks, mostly because of rising domestic production, and were more than 10 percent above their five-year average near the end of October.

Energy Information Administration figures for the week ending Nov. 1 due Wednesday are expected to show a further increase of 2.5 million barrels, according to a survey of analysts by Platts, the energy information arm of McGraw-Hill Cos.

Brent crude, the international benchmark, was up 65 cents at $105.98 a barrel on the ICE exchange in London.

In other energy futures trading on Nymex:

— Wholesale gasoline added 3.4 cents to $2.55 a gallon.

— Heating oil rose 2 cents to $2.884 a gallon.

— Natural gas gained 1.3 cents to per $3.479 per 1,000 cubic feet.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/oil-hovers-below-94-ahead-us-supplies-report-081512792–finance.html
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Lydia McLaughlin Leaving Real Housewives of Orange County: Texted Costars, Hasn’t Heard Back Yet

No goodbye party? Lydia McLaughlin exclusively told Us Weekly in Monday, Nov. 4 that she has decided not to return for season nine of The Real Housewives of Orange County. That same day, shortly after the announcement was made, the Bravo star attended TV Guide Magazine’s Hot List Party in Hollywood and told Us that she hasn’t heard from her former costars . . . yet. 

“A lot of them that are still filming are on a trip to Hawaii,” McLaughlin, 32, explained. “So hopefully the news just broke today and I texted all of them, so maybe I have a couple of text messages. I don’t know yet.”

PHOTOS: Before they were Housewives

The Canadian-born magazine entrepreneur is exiting the Bravo reality show after just one season. Costars Alexis Bellino and Gretchen Rossi were fired back in September, leaving Vicki Gunvalson, Tamra Barney and Heather Dubrow as the remaining cast members. No word yet on who might be joining the cast.

McLaughlin told Us her decision to quit took “frickin’ huevos of steel,” but added, “I know in [my] heart of hearts it’s the right decision for me and for my family, and just this time in my life.”

PHOTOS: Stars who were fired

The married mother of two also said that, for the most part, her fans have been supportive of of her decision. “The one thing I got that I didn’t expect on Twitter were a lot of my fans were like, ‘Today we found out Lydia is the smartest Housewife,'” she shared. “Little comments like that make me laugh and make me happy that people kind of get me.”

PHOTOS: Biggest Housewives fights ever

McLaughlin previously told Us that there is “no epic story” behind her exit from The Real Housewives of Orange County. “I never wanted to make a career out of being a housewife. That’s never really been a dream of mine,” explained McLaughlin, who owns Beverly Hills Lifestyle magazine with husband Doug, 33. “I want to build my brand outside of the Housewives — I’ve always been really honest with the producers about that. I knew that while I was filming it that I probably wasn’t going to be doing it again.”

But she may not be saying goodbye to reality TV for good. “I definitely have plans to continue to sparkle fairy dust and be a light!” she told Us. “I want to develop our own reality show about our magazine and all the glitz and glamour involved with publishing it.”

Source: http://www.usmagazine.com/entertainment/news/lydia-mclaughlin-leaving-real-housewives-of-orange-county-texted-costars-hasnt-heard-back-yet-2013511
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Bellator sets viewership record for Saturday night special

As most would have expected, the biggest and most hyped show in Bellator history drew the largest television audience ever to see the product.

Saturday’s show from Long Beach, Calif., originally a pay-per-view, turned into a Spike TV special, did an average of 1.1 million viewers over the three hours of 45 minutes of programming.

The show broke the company’s record of 938,000 viewers set on its debut on the network on Jan. 17, a show that featured two championship fights, Michael Chandler vs. Rick Hawn for the lightweight title, and Pat Curran vs. Patricio “Pitbull” Freire for the featherweight title.

This show did more than one better when it came to quality of the lineup. Chandler headlined against former champion Eddie Alvarez in a rematch of the most famous, and arguably the best fight in Bellator history. The rematch, a five-round war where Alvarez won a razor-thin split decision, saw the Philadelphia product capture the title and set up a third meeting. The show also had Curran lose his title to Daniel Straus, and an interim light heavyweight title fight with Emanuel Newton winning a decision over “King” Mo Lawal.

The 1.1 million viewers would have been the most-watched live MMA fight show on U.S. television since UFC’s debut on Fox Sports 1 on Aug. 17.

The show was moved to a Spike special after weeks of television and print advertising had gone out for the event as a pay-per-view headlined by Tito Ortiz vs. Rampage Jackson. Bellator MMA and Spike changed plans just days before the event when Ortiz pulled out of the fight due to a fractured neck.

Because the show ran long, and those who attempted to watch the show via DVR may have missed much of the main event, Spike announced the complete Chandler vs. Alvarez main event would be replayed on Friday night at 8 p.m., serving as a lead-in to the usual 9 p.m. start weekly show. Cheick Kongo vs. Peter Graham in the finals of a heavyweight tournament, and Joe Warren vs. Travis Marx in the finals of the bantamweight tournament, headline the live show. The winners of both fights are in line for title shots.

The show peaked at 1.4 million viewers at 11:17 p.m., so the late time slot also prevented the maximum number of viewers to watch the main event, which started at about 12:10 a.m.

Spike finished second in the Male 18-49 demographic on cable Saturday night.

Source: http://www.mmafighting.com/2013/11/6/5070442/bellator-sets-viewership-record-for-saturday-night-special
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Apple Wishes It Could Tell You More About US Government Info Requests

Apple Wishes It Could Tell You More About US Government Info Requests

Like everybody and their sister in Silicon Valley, Apple is now publishing transparency reports. The Cupertino company’s first ever disclosure on the number of government information requests just hit the web, and like everybody else, the number of requests from the U.S. government is super high.

Read more…

    



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Wes Anderson’s ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’ to Open Berlin Film Fest

“The Grand Budapest Hotel”

The world premiere of Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel will open the 64th Berlin International Film Festival in 2014.

The Grand Budapest Hotel, a U.K./German co-production, recounts the adventures of a legendary concierge at a famous European hotel between the wars and a lobby boy who becomes his most trusted friend.

PHOTOS: Wes Anderson’s ‘Grand Budapest Hotel’: Meet Its 16 Characters

Shot on location in Germany, mainly in Gorlitz and other parts of Saxony, and also at Studio Babelsberg in Potsdam, the movie stars Ralph Fiennes, Tony Revolori, Tilda Swinton and Paul Schlase.

The cast also boasts F. Murray Abraham, Mathieu Amalric, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Jeff Goldblum, Harvey Keitel, Jude Law, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Saoirse Ronan, Jason Schwartzman, Lea Seydoux, Tom Wilkinson and Owen Wilson.

The movie will unspool in the festival’s traditional home for galas at the Berlinale Palast on Feb. 6.

“We are very delighted that Wes Anderson will open the 64th Berlinale with his new film, The Grand Budapest Hotel. With unmistakable Wes Anderson charm, this comedy promises to kick things off in a big way,” said festival director Dieter Kosslick.

VIDEO: ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’ Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel is produced by Grand Budapest Limited (U.K.) and Neunzehnte Babelsberg Film (Germany).

Anderson, Scott Rudin, Steven M. Rales and Jeremy Dawson are the producers.

Fox Searchlight Pictures will release movie in U.S. cinemas on March 7, 2014.

Anderson has previously landed at the Berlinale with two films in the festival’s competition section, The Royal Tenenbaums (2002) and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2005).

The film is scheduled to roll out across Europe in February and March 2014.

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